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Did Nintendo And The Wii U Get it All Wrong?

Less than 2 weeks ago, I seriously started considering upgrading the hard drive space on my PS3, as I now have just 20 GB left out of 120. I have only now just began to download games onto my PS3 as I am a proud new Playstation Plus member, but the astonishing thing I’ve realized is just how fast you can burn though 100GB of hard drive space.  So after getting all the juicy specs of the Wii U, I can’t help but feel that maybe, just maybe, Nintendo may have gotten it wrong with the Wii U when it comes to hard drive space.

The Wii U is setting up to be the first Next Gen console out on the market out of the Big 3.  Though some feel that it’s under-powered, I prefer to reserve judgement on that, and let it’s games do the talking, (or forever hold their peace) as it will be on display for all to see when it’s all said and done.  The PlayStation 3 and the XBox 360, both current gen consoles, have far more storage space than both models of the announced Wii U.  And the PS Vita, a handheld, offers just as much storage as the best version of the Wii U.  If you haven’t guessed it already, my point is simple, games these days require a lot of hard drive space, and I think that this can become a huge factor for Nintendo and the Wii U.

Wii U all wrong

I have an 8GB Memory Card in my PS Vita and I’m nearly out of space after downloading 3 game demos, 6 apps, 2 full PS Vita games, and 3 PSP games, and that’s it.  And I don’t even really want to go into details about PS3 games as they are much bigger in file size; one game alone could take more than 8GB.   So looking at the Wii U Specs, I keep asking myself, if current gen DL games are requiring so much hard drive space now, is it not going to be even more in demand for Next gen games? And if the answer to that question is yes, then have Nintendo and the Wii U gotten it all wrong?  Have they underestimated the demands for Downloadable Content in the market?

Now that we know what the specs are for Wii U, are you planning on getting one?  And will hard drive space play a big factor in your decision?

 
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9 thoughts on “Did Nintendo And The Wii U Get it All Wrong?

  1. Yes I am planing on getting a Wii U for Christmas, the ability to plug in external hardrives makes any space concerns a non-issue for me but I’m sure this will give some people the needed ammunition to bag the console before it’s even out the gate.

    • HI Olden, and thanks for taking the time to leave your thoughts.

      I don’t want the point to be lost here, as the goal is not to put the system in a bad light. The concern though, is a legit one I believe. You have to search hard nowadays to find a game that doesn’t have DLCs, and one can easily imagine that that those DLCs will be considerably bigger in size then this current gen, and the goes for games. Yes I can buy a bigger hard drive, but for next gen system like the Wii U, who’s pushing graphics that marginally better then the PS3 and XBox 360, I would have expected a sku with at least 100GB of hard drive space for the price of the Premium Wii U Premium. 5-6 year old consoles are selling with nearly 7 times the amount of hard drive space that the best Wii U can offer, I mean cmon, clearly space is an issue people, and I think Nintendo should have a better on that front.

  2. Stop whinning and get a hard drive according to your needs. It’s obvious they’re not gonna pack a bigger hard drive as part of their bundles when not everybody downloads that much stuff.

    • Hi Erick, and thanks for sharing your thoughts.

      I think that’s the point I’m trying to make here. I’m not expecting them to put enough space to suffice the demands for someone who download all their games, (which I don’t do, I prefer physical copies). But the whole point is that with either models, you don’t need to do much downloading. Ghost Recon Future Soldier is 11GB on the PSN Store, and already has 2 DLC packs which adds to the total. WarHammer 40,000 is 6.6 GB. So you couldn’t even consider these 2 (Current Gen) games on Wii U Basic with just 8GB, and you would have already used over half of your hard drive on the Premium 32 GB version.

      All companies have have a low end and a high end version of a specific product. PS3 does it, XBox 360 does it, and I think Nintendo didn’t really do a good job finding the middle ground with the limited space they’re offering on either Skus.

  3. I realize what you are pointing out here, and it is a very important subject. Storage can make or break an digital distribution system. However, I feel Nintendo has done a good enough job with allowing users to connect external HDs up to 3 TBs (which I think is plenty of space). There is a lot of confusion about this, which makes me think Nintendo might have wanted to include an external HD rather than increase internal storage size for the deluxe edition of the system (this would show consumers that this is possible). I do however like Nintendo’s move of not including and being dependent on an internal hard drive, because when I want to increase the storage of console I do not want to open the box and deal with a lot of proprietary mess inside.

    • Hi “AM” and thanks for your thoughts

      I agree that they Nintendo did allow for the Wii U’s hard drive to be upgraded, but So does the PS3 and the XBox 360. In my opinion though, the fact that you can upgrade the hard drive is not reason enough to not have a decent amount of hard drive space on a next-gen console, when current gen consoles have, and DEMONSTRATED that hard drive space is a big player now, and will be more so in the future. Sony included big hard hard drives for the PS3 even though you can upgrade it. I feel that what Nintendo did is basically forcing nearly everyone who buys a Wii U to have to upgrade the hard drive. I believe that it’s a mistake on their part, Smart business move, but not soo good for the consumer, who will no doubt fill up that hard drive space very quickly.

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